Christ should be manifest in our whole life: how to achieve Christian perfection

As I sit here on the shores of Lake Atitlan this morning, the Office of Readings this morning had provided another gem to chew on and mull over.

From a treatise on Christian Perfection by Saint Gregory of Nyssa, bishop

(PG 46, 283-286)

Christ should be manifest in our whole life

“The life of the Christian has three distinguishing aspects: deeds, words and thought. Thought comes first, then words, since our words express openly the interior conclusions of the mind. Finally, after thoughts and words, comes action, for our deeds carry out what the mind has conceived. So when one of these results in our acting or speaking or thinking, we must make sure that all our thoughts, words and deeds are controlled by the divine ideal, the revelation of Christ. For then our thoughts, words and deeds will not fall short of the nobility of their implications.

What then must we do, we who have been found worthy of the name of Christ? Each of us must examine his thoughts, words and deeds, to see whether they are directed toward Christ or are turned away from him. This examination is carried out in various ways. Our deeds or our thoughts or our words are not in harmony with Christ if they issue from passion. They then bear the mark of the enemy who smears the pearl of the heart with the slime of passion, dimming and even destroying the luster of the precious stone.

On the other hand, if they are free from and untainted by every passionate inclination, they are directed toward Christ, the author and source of peace. He is like a pure, untainted stream. If you draw from him the thoughts in your mind and the inclinations of your heart, you will show a likeness to Christ, your source and origin, as the gleaming water in a jar resembles the flowing water from which it was obtained.

For the purity of Christ and the purity that is manifest in our hearts are identical. Christ’s purity, however, is the fountainhead; ours has its source in him and flows out of him. Our life is stamped with the beauty of his thought. The inner and the outer man are harmonized in a kind of music. The mind of Christ is the controlling influence that inspires us to moderation and goodness in our behavior. As I see it, Christian perfection consists in this: sharing the titles which express the meaning of Christ’s name, we bring out this meaning in our minds, our prayers and our way of life.”

Some questions for reflection:

Does my life bear witness to the marks of our Savior, crucified?

Does my life lead others to Christ through my thought, word, deed, and action?

“Our lives are stamped with his thought” we’re created in the very image of the living God. Do our lives reflect the beauty and love of our creator?

“The inner and outer man are harmonized in a kind of music.” Are we healthy? Do we know ourselves? Who we are before God? Who we are before our brothers and sisters? Does our inner life and outer life live in harmony, reflecting the beautiful work of His hands that we are?

Musings from the Castle on the Hill

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So, when I first created this site, it was firstly to advertise for some of the services that I offered on the side of working at Dairy Queen, hence the Bruns Design Studios page, but after joining Seminary, I wanted a place where I could blog about things that interested me, and about life as a college Seminarian. The first thing I knew I needed was a name for my blog, well here I am 7 months after starting my blog portion of this site and I finally chose a name. I had started with a temporary name of “Non Ministrari, sed ministrare”, now after thinking about it long enough, I decided on a more permanent name: “Musings from the Castle on the Hill”.

Why did I choose this name? Well, firstly my Seminary is literally a Castle, secondly the term: “Castle on the Hill” comes from a name that the Carmelite Monastery that is now our seminary was called. I am fascinated with history, especially Catholic building history. So it is no surprise that one of the things I looked for first at Marian University’s Mother Theresa Hackelmeir(sp) Library was books on the history of our Carmel. Well I did find some very neat books, and one of my goals next semester is to post some of the things from in them here.

Part of the original plan for the Carmelite Monastery of the Resurrection was to have it built up on a hill, overlooking the road. Well in present-day Indianapolis, that dream was short-lived, as the Castle is not the far above the ground level, because of the level they made the roads, but I like the name and it still stuck for many years of the Monastery. My hope is that through this blog, I will be able to make posts that capture a little bit of what Mother Theresa Seelbach, the founding carmelite nun, dreamt of for her monastery. Until then, have a blessed Christmas Eve! Come, O Come Emmanuel!

ArchBishop Tobin Installation

We are ready for the Installation of ArchBishop Tobin. I am assisting the priest commentator, so I get to see the behind the scenes work that is being broadcast. Tune into http://www.ewtn.com, http://www.catholictv.com, or http://www.archindy.org to watch us live for the Installation Mass of ArchBishop Tobin as the 6th ArchBishop of Indianapolis. Live in 50 minutes!

Pray that everything goes smooth please!

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