2014: Gossip, Anger, Forgiveness, Joy, and Blessings

2014. What a year it has been! I am amazed at how quickly the years keep going by. As we keep moving forward in time, we each keep gaining more things to do and fill our time with. This year has been full of blessings without measure. I’m sure that each one of us could name our blessings in this year, but can we name the wrongs we have committed against others and whether or not we have been forgiven them? I’ll reflect on that in a moment, but first here are some of my “top” moments of 2014:

Directing the Brass Quartet

Directing the Brass Quartet

January 2014:

  • March for Life in DC!

March 2014:

  • Attended the 17th annual Youth 2000, my 6th or 7th one!

May 2014:

  • Started working AGAIN at Gasper River Catholic Youth Camp & Retreat Center. What a blessing to call this place my second home in Kentucky! I love my Gasper family!

    Working at camp - Selfie!

    Working at camp – Selfie!

June 2014:

  • My dear friend and brother  Will Thompson was ordained a priest! Father Will had a beautiful Ordination and Mass, which I was blessed to take part in.wpid-img_20140601_164852174_hdr.jpg wpid-img_20140614_194054167_hdr.jpg
  • I turned 20! Two decades old, nothing too special about this birthday though!
  • Sponsored my cousin Raymond Musholt, as he was confirmed under the patronage of St Eligius! What a joyous day!

    With Ray (Eligius) at his Confirmation

    With Ray (Eligius) at his Confirmation

  • Participated in St. Joseph, BG’s Corpus Christi Procession. What a wonderful procession with our Lord!wpid-img_20140727_082503102.jpg

July 2014:

  • Celebrated my dear friend Kaffryn’s birthday with a bunch of friends and fun!10492184_10203329489111987_8759803617691381455_n

August 2014:

  • Camp ended 😦
  • Junior year of college seminary began!10414434_10201857998651758_4180219194056489891_n 10704126_10203964369903045_2397698355877978784_n

September 2014:

  • Bishop Simon Bruté College Seminary turned 10 years old!
  • Started my ministry assignment at St. Joan of Arc in Indy! I love every minute of it!

October 2014:

  • Parents and Pastors Day with the Brass Quartet and Organ!

November 2014:

  • Attended my second ODYC! Saw lots of amazing campers and friends from across the Diocese!10806489_730417970359575_5743648509804853820_n
  • My third niece, Nora Lynn was born!

December 2014:

  • Went on a 9 day pilgrimage to the Holy Land with my brothers from Bruté. What an amazing experience of which I will always remember!10689572_10205559876693166_1067577437774352330_n 10845911_10205544349064985_4690569302940670562_n
    The pilgrim group from the Seminary

    The pilgrim group from the Seminary

    Me, on the Sea of Galilee

    Me, on the Sea of Galilee

    Me, on Mt. Tabor

    Me, on Mt. Tabor

    The Owensboro pilgrims!  (CJ Glaser, Jacob Fischer, me)

    The Owensboro pilgrims!
    (CJ Glaser, Jacob Fischer, me)

    Me in front of the Church of St. Ann

    Me in front of the Church of St. Ann

    Featured Image -- 3197 Featured Image -- 3195

    Church of the Pater Noster

    Church of the Pater Noster

    Basilica of St. Stephen

    Basilica of St. Stephen

  • Saw my new niece for the first time!
  • Saw my Quincy relatives for the first time in over a year!

As I think of the joys of 2014, I am also reminded of the wrongs I have done and what I must continue to do. I call to mind St. Paul’s First letter to the Thessalonians:

“Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.”

It amazes me how much energy we as humans give to being angry and upset toward others. We talk about each other and gossip about who’s with who, what that person did that we didn’t like, how we are going to let that person have it because of this one time… The list goes on and on and on! We waste so much precious time being angry and upset at each other instead of giving our brothers and sisters what the Lord offers each of us at every moment: forgiveness.

Personally I struggle at times with forgiving others for their transgressions against me. Call it my german-blood, stubbornness, or just pride, it is something that I and most humans struggle with. The ability to forgive others is a virtue that we can all do with more of. So how do we get it? Well, one of the things I have done since middle school is each night, placing the names of those who irritated me, wronged me, or who are angry at me and place them at the foot of the Cross, giving them from myself to our Lord, the Just judge and letting him deal with it. Through letting Christ work on the Hearts of those who are angry at me and through forgiving those who have wronged me I tend to be a much happier person.

Now, I’m not perfect and sometimes I do tend to be angry at others, but each night I am faithful to asking our Lord to give me the grace to forgive and moving on. Each new day is a new start to be Christ to others and receive him from others into my own life. During our pilgrimage to the Holy Land a few weeks ago, Tony, our tour guide told us of the significance of “turning the other cheek.” To smack a man with the back of your hand was to take away his dignity and treat him as not human. When the man would then turn his cheek the other way, you had to smack him again with your palm, acknowledging that he was a man and deserved respect. In a way you forgave him of his wrong. As we progress to this new year, let us turn the other cheek. Let us forgive and forget. And let us devote all of our new energy to praying without ceasing for others, for building up God’s kingdom and for spreading his Gospel of love throughout the world!

2014 is a year in the books! Let’s pray for the blessings of 2015 and for the good work we will be able to accomplish together for Christ’s glory in these next 365 days! Thank-you all for your support, love, and prayers over this past year. Without them, I couldn’t be where I am today. May God reward you in this New Year

To God be the glory! To the heights!

O Mary my Mother, I consecrate to Jesus your Son, through your Immaculate Heart all of the actions, experiences, and undertakings of 2015. I ask that you watch over me in this new year as you always do, and that our Lord will bless each person that I come in contact with. Make me an humble instrument of the Lord, as you were. Help me to accept his will in my life and to surrender myself more completely to his plan. O Mary, Mother of God lead me to your Son, the source of my happiness and joy, the giver of my Salvation. AmenCapture2

Holy Land Pilgrimage – Final Thoughts

The Owensboro pilgrims!  (CJ Glaser, Jacob Fischer, me)

The Owensboro pilgrims!
(CJ Glaser, Jacob Fischer, me)

Words cannot express how blessed I have been over the past week. Getting to walk in the Footsteps of Christ, from his humble birth in the cave stable in Bethlehem to his ministry along the shores of the Sea of Galilee, to his entry into Jerusalem, and his cruel death upon the Cross. Finally experiencing the joys of His Resurrection from the tomb. I have made the pilgrimage of a lifetime.

My faith has been strengthened and my relationship with Christ deepened. I can’t name just one place or one experience that was my favorite. If I had to, I could probably name three sites, but that’s not really important. What is important is taking what I have learned and experienced and sharing it with others. I have come to know Jesus Christ in such an amazing way and will marvel and relish as the Scriptures continue to come alive for me in different ways for years to come.

Thinking back to the passage from John 6, 68-9 where Christ has just given the Bread of Life Discourse, explaining the Eucharist, some of those following could not understand the meaning behind eating the body and blood of Christ and they left him. Turning to the remaining ones, Jesus asked: “And do you also wish to leave? Peter turning to him said: “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. You are the Christ, the Son of God.”

I am so thankful for my Catholic faith that I have received from my family and those who have built it up and encouraged me along the way thus far. After this trip I am extremely indebted and thankful to those who made it possible. Without your generosity I would not have been able to go. Thank-you so much!

Here I am pictured outside the Church of St. Ann, where I prayed for all of you from my parish and anyone else who helped make this trip possible. May God reward you as abundantly as he has blessed me this past week!

“Domine, ad quem ibimus? Verba vitae aeternae habes. Tu es Christus Filius Dei.” (“Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. You are the Christ, the Son of God.)

This was reblogged from my Facebook page on Tekton Ministries blog here.

Another post by Tekton in which I am tagged is available here.

Me in front of the Church of St. Ann

Me in front of the Church of St. Ann

Basilica of St. Stephen

Basilica of St. Stephen

Me, on Mt. Tabor

Me, on Mt. Tabor

Me, on the Sea of Galilee

Me, on the Sea of Galilee

The pilgrim group from the Seminary

The pilgrim group from the Seminary

Singing is a Lover’s Thing – Why I listen to Christian Music

“The singing of the Church comes ultimately out of love. It is the utter depth of love that produces the singing. “Cantare amantis est”, says St. Augustine, singing is a lover’s thing.” – Pope Benedict XVI

Nota Bene: “I listen to all genre’s of music. While in the Liturgy I generally tend to prefer hymns and chant’s there is a proper and extremely important place for the beautiful use of good, solid Christian music. These are my thought…

Music of all genres can inspire us to think of God. Whether it be a beautiful violin solo, a barber shop quartet, a hymn, or another form of music, we cannot really define a form of music as not having anything to do with God, unless it has qualities which go against God or the laws he has ordained. What makes us think of God or worship God is not so much the  genre of music, but the beauty behind the instrumentation, lyrics, and voice of the singer. What is beauty? That gets into things too deep than in this post, though I have blogged about it before, here.

christian-music-I-love

Beauty is what lifts our hearts and minds to God. Now, I will argue that some types of music do not have a good message behind them and they definitely do not make us think of God or have a desire to worship him. In particular there are two types of music, which people generally associate with God and with worshiping him: Christian music and hymns. Both forms of music are generally seen by the listeners as giving praise to God the creator. Some would argue that Christian music does not lead the soul to Christ, as it only pertains to those who are already believers, I would disagree and here is why:

scripture

Almost all Christian music, is scriptural based. It is basically taking the psalms and other parts of scripture to music, much like when we chant the psalms for the Liturgy of the Hours or pray using scripture. The Psalms are the original songs, written by David for praising his creator. To sing them in another way is not to say that they no longer give him praise, rather it is to say that something has touched people’s hearts in it and it is a way of reaching out to them and bringing them to the faith.

Christian Music shares the message of the Gospel. That is not to say that Christian music doesn’t have it flaws. Like any other type of music it can fail in some circumstances. Some would argue that Christian music portrays a false sense of the sacrifice or cross required to live the faith. Yes, there is no cross without the resurrection, but does it hurt to have music which doesn’t always talk about pain and suffering? No. It actually can be a nice break. Christian music shares the message of the Gospel. That is, our hope in the Resurrection even in our somewhat broken and sinful human condition. And there are plenty of christian songs which do talk about the crosses we bear, but who really wants to intentionally listen to music about our failings? We want hopeful, vibrant music which again lifts our hearts and minds to God.

Christian Music is unique in it’s own way. Where did anyone ever say that Christian music was supposed to talk “subtly” about faith in Jesus? It has his name in it’s genre type for pete’s sake. The idea behind Christian music, is not to shy away and hint around at Jesus, rather to share the message of love, mercy, forgiveness, and more that can be ours if we embrace his call.

Sure, it’s fine if you prefer to listen to other types of music and discover God. There can be beauty in it as well, remember, music of all genre’s can inspire us to think of God. That is where the role of beauty comes into play. If you desire to listen to religious music, with a somewhat “pop” flare to it, without the meter of a hymn that’s great. That is your prerogative. Our goal is not to not give glory to God, rather to give glory to him in all that we do. Remember, singing is a lover’s thing. To sing to our creator in whatever fashion we choose, deepens our relationship with him and draws us close. So the next time you think about turning off that Christian song on the radio, leave it on and think of the way in which it can guide your soul to God. There’s a reason KLove calls it the KLove Challenge. Listening to music which serves a higher purpose and expressly talks about God, rather than shying away from it can deepen your prayer life.

Come to your beloved, sing to him in song. Remember that singing is out of love. We sing to the one we love and he sings to us throughout our lives. Singing is a lover’s thing.

I think that Gungor’s song using St. Augustine’s words: “Late Have I Loved You” fit well…

Late have I loved you,
O Beauty so ancient,
so new.

late have I loved you
you were within me, but I was outside you
it was there that I searched for you
it was there that I searched for you

Late have I loved you,
O Beauty so ancient, so new.
you were here with me
but I was not with You
it was there that you found me
it was there that you found me

You called and you shouted,
you broke through my deafness.
You flashed and you shone,
dispelled my blindness.
You breathed your fragrance on me
You breathed your fragrance on me
Late have I loved you

I drew in your breath
I keep on breathing
I’ve tasted I’ve seen
And now I want more
You breathed your fragrance on me
You breathed your fragrance on me
Late have I loved you

It’s time’s like these that I thank God I’m in seminary!

1229875_10202094147372099_858042945_n

Bruté Men, before the Respect for Life Dinner – Downtown Indy

Tonight was our senior night festivities at the Seminary. We had the meal planned out, the chefs ready to cook, and the night went off basically without a hitch. It was an absolutely beautiful celebration of our seniors, their impact on us and the seminary community and just the real fraternal and brotherly spirit at Bishop Bruté.

I am constantly amazed and so full of hope for the future of the church in American, when I am with my brothers at Bruté. As someone remarked tonight: “The Quality of our men at Bishop Bruté is some of the best.” Being in seminary, has given me the opportunity to live, pray, study, and labor in the vineyard of the Lord beside 42 men who share the same love for the Lord, for service, and who will the good of everyone. The fraternal spirit and utter love and devotion of each man to the other is something extraordinary and not explainable. I don’t even think anyone can understand it, except for those men who have spent time in seminary.

The quality of friendships, the vulnerability we place ourselves in before our brothers, the trust we place in them, and the desire for them to be holy is utterly amazing. I’ve had great friends throughout the years in high school and such, but no one has ever been a better, or closer friend then the men I am in seminary with.  I thank God for letting me be a part of their lives every day.

We say goodbye to a superb group of men in our senior class this year. I have grown close to them all and hold them in such high esteem. From challenging me to continue to stretch myself, listening to me when I’m frustrated, sharing wisdom with me and being just good solid men and brothers in Christ I couldn’t ask for anything better. I will deeply miss them but know that we will keep in touch and one day we will hopefully serve at the Altar of God together.

Tonight we received some sad news about the passing of one of our men’s close family members. News and details are still forthcoming, so I don’t want to say much, especially before the family and such have a time to grieve and get the news out. But after finding out about it from Fr. Bob after we finished our senior dinner and speeches tonight, I was shocked by the drastic change in the feeling  of the room and the temperament of all of the men. We instantly felt compassion and such sadness for our brother, all of us feeling as though it was one of our own family members.

Before we cleaned up from the dinner we all headed to the chapel to pray a Divine Mercy Chaplet for our brother, his family, and the deceased. The amount of love which was poured into that chaplet was so powerful and inspiring. It is times like this when I thank God I’m in seminary with such great brothers.

Please join us on this now somewhat somber night to pray for our brother, his family, and the repose of the soul of his family member. May we continue to pray for one another, build each other up, and keep fighting the good fight until we all meet together in that beautiful place of Heaven.

In somewhat modified words of our brother: “Let us give ourselves completely to the will of God. Life is to short to do anything else.”

Eternal Rest grant unto our brother’s family member O Lord…

lentenseries

The following is a video of our Year in Review at Bishop Bruté. Check it out and see some of the glimpses of fraternity and brotherly love that exist within the walls of our seminary:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5gLgrEpRkk#t=361

Link to my Interview on VocationBoom! Radio

Link to my Interview on VocationBoom! Radio

coreyradio

On Saturday, I was interviewed by VocationBoom! Radio, a national radio show on over 230 radio affiliates. It is an hour long program and consists of my “shortened” vocation story (covering my life in Quincy, Beatrice, and Kentucky), answering questions from call-ins as well as talking about life as a seminarian from the Diocese of Owensboro attending Bishop Simon Bruté College Seminary. Click on the link above, scroll to the bottom and click on the show for March 29, 2014. If you haven’t invited a young man to consider a vocation to the priesthood, please suggest it to him, pray for more vocations, and visit VocationBoom.com for more info, such as joining their prayer network.

 

+AMDG+

 

O Mary queen of priests – pray for us!

My Solemn Vow – Marriage, a beautiful vocation!

Tonight at dinner, a few of the men and I were discussing marriage. More specifically the great love that couples have for one another. We were discussing about friends and family members who after dying, their spouse dies a short time later. Marriage is a great and beautiful vocation. As we near our Spring Break at Bishop Bruté, I am reminded that we normally start to hear men stand up and announce that they are discerning out of seminary, and discerning where else God is calling them in life. Normally, it leads to marriage. Let us pray for good holy vocations to Marriage, for a greater respect for marriage in our country and for a greater sense of the sacramental nature of marriage. Please also pray for those men who will be announcing that they are discerning out of seminary, that God will be with them, grant them peace in their discernment and his joy in life. Phillip Stopford, who wrote “Do Not Be Afraid” that we sang a while back also composed: “My Solemn Vow,” the attached video. Enjoy it! It is of marriage vows set to music and it brought me to tears! In the video, tenor and soprano sing their vows to one another.

To close, here is a line from a book that has always stood out to me: “There is a legend about a bird which sings just once in its life, more sweetly than any other creature on the face of the earth. From the moment it leaves the nest it searches for a thorn tree, and does not rest until it has found one. Then singing among the savage branches, it impales itself upon the largest, sharpest spine. And, dying it rises above its own agony to out-carol the lark and the nightingale. One superlative song, existence the price. But the whole world stills to listen, and God in His heaven smiles. For the best is only bought at the cost of great pain…. Or so says the legend.” – The Thornbirds (Yes, I know that the book doesn’t portray certain things correctly, the quote is quite lovely though.)

Marriage is a beautiful vocation, many are called, others are not. What are you called to? How are you answering your vocation? Couples, religious, and priests all take vows. Which will you choose or have chosen? What is your Solemn Vow?

You mean you’ll never get married?

the-cardinal-from-warner-brosNote: This post was originally written on Feb. 14th.)

I’m sitting here in a comfy armchair, watching a movie on tv, drinking a delicious cup of Earl Grey tea and relaxing with friends. Anything wrong or strange with that? No, it sounds normal. Now here’s some more information. I am sitting a room, surrounded by 30 something pictures/statues of different popes, watching The Cardinal, surrounded by 5 other men, all my age. Sound a little strange yet? Yeah, maybe a little. Today is also Valentine’s day, it’s a Friday night and oh I almost forgot, I’m a seminarian at seminary.

Most everyone else my age are out on date’s, including married couples and they say that “love is in the air.” I’m writing this post, not wishing that I was on a date, nor upset that others are, but because of a line from The Cardinal, that struct me. In the movie a man asks the cardinal: “Can you imagine a life without making love?” I’m going to take that another way and say: “Can you imagine a life without getting married?”  (Remember, sex is reserved for marriage, not beforehand.)

That question, is something that I have heard quite frequently, growing up, though in different ways. People would say things like: “You want, to be a priest? Doesn’t that mean that you’ll never get married?” “You mean, you can’t even have a girlfriend?” “You can’t have sex?” “You’ll never have a family?” “You don’t want to have children?”

“What’s wrong with you?” My answer: “Quite a bit actually, I’m a sinner.” (feel free to laugh)

What is it that would make me, or any other man my age (even women in religious communities) want to forego marriage, not have physical intimacy with another, not have biological children, and go against everything that is seen as “normal” in today’s world?

Others.

Marriage is a sacred covenant a Sacrament between God, a man, and a woman. The two give themselves to one another in one of the highest levels of self-gift, literally becoming one flesh. The fruit of their love is children, a continuation of themselves. Marriage is good. Sex is good. Children are good. Married couples give themselves to one another, they cease to live just for themselves and the live for the other, live for protecting, caring, and providing for themselves and their children, etc. Marriage leads you to love another, but it keeps it in a select few. (family members, friends, etc.)

Back to the main question though, why would I or anyone give-up all of that? I answered that it is for others. I also stated above, that marriage leads you to love another. But what about celibacy?

Dictionary.com refers to Celibacy as: “a person who abstains from sexual relations, and a person who remains unmarried, particularly for religious reasons.”

Recently at Bishop Bruté, we were graced to have Brother John Mark Falkenhain, a Benedictine Monk from St. Meinrad come and give us a Day of Recollection on Celibacy. He started out by asking two questions to begin with:

  1. Why did you decide to become a priest? (yes, we are still discerning)
  2. What made you choose celibacy?

I have blogged before on why I want to become a priest, (actually no I haven’t, I realized that it is still a draft. I shall publish that sometime soon.) But why did I choose celibacy? That was an important question that I have been asking myself since joining seminary, and will continue asking until I make my Deacon Promises and am ordained, God willing.

What should the answer look like? I’ll get there. But first, let’s go back to my original question, of why on earth would anyone want to become a celibate? Others.

Being a single celibate, can have good financial and theological reasonings in the church. For instance: If a priest had a family with a wife and kids the financial stress that would put on the parish, people, and the priest would be immense. (Yes, it can be done, and it is with priests that are ordained from other faiths who converted. Even they speak though of the need for celibacy.) A priest would not be able to give his family the amount of time and attention that they require, as well as his parishioners. There is also the theological reasonings: namely, Christ was a single male, priests stand in persona Christi capitis (In the person of Christ, the head), thus being married, would not enable them to be an alter christus (another Christ). They could not represent him in the same way, which they do.

There has to be more though, no? It isn’t just theological or financial reasoning, as to why I would want to choose celibacy, there is something else that exists. Others.

Celibacy as Bro. John Mark pointed out, has to result in an increased capacity for love. How does it lead to love? A celibate is able to give completely of himself to others. (Hey, I keep saying that!) Being free from family, a celibate is able to give himself completely to the people of God. Okay, so that does sound a little cliché, let’s see if we can expound upon it a little.

Celibacy frees a man to give himself, body, and soul to the work of the salvation of souls. Brother John Mark started off his presentation by telling us that: “celibacy is like a box, yes it is confining, but that’s part of it.” When we gain self-knowledge, on who we are, how we define ourselves, we are then able to accept ourselves, for who we are and be comfortable with it. Only when we have a healthy balance of self-knowledge and self-acception can we hope to be able to give of ourselves in a meaningful way to others.

Celibacy calls us to love others and God more! We are called to give our desires and feelings to God and in service to others, thus taking the energy, time, etc. that we would give a spouse and turning it around, offering it to God and using it to minister to his people.

That’s not to say that celibacy is not difficult. Yes, there will be times when I feel alone. There will be times when I ask myself why I did all of this, but the end is worth it. We move through it. We focus on God and the outcome, have time for spiritual reflection, learn more about ourselves and recommit ourselves to the task of salvation.

As men of ministry we are called to give ourselves away to others, regardless of whether we like them or not. In a sense, we are called to show them hospitality and be Christ to them.

Being a celibate has its fun moments. See my blogpost here about 27 celibates singing happy birthday to a woman at a restaurant. Celibacy is not a price to pay for something else, it is a gift from God. And we recognize that that gift is something special. When I take a vow of celibacy I will not have everything that I need to live the life of a celibate. I won’t know absolutely positively for sure if it’s for me. But I will be very, very, close to being sure. As long as I am living a spiritual holy life, doing everything that I can to follow God’s will and rule in my life, I ask God to supply the rest.

And supply it he does! As a celibate, I am called to turn my loneliness into solitude. To reap the spiritual benefits, and give of myself completely without reserve to the people of God. I am called to a life of love. Not a life of spousal, intimate love; rather a life of self-knowledge, acceptance, and gift.

Sitting here in my comfy arm chair, watching a movie with my brothers is not lonely, it is not saddening, it does not cause me any turmoil. The only thing that brings me pain, is that myUnilever-on-tea-Available-evidence-supports-tea-and-tea-ingredients-for-mood-and-performance-benefits_strict_xxl tea cup is almost empty! Instead, it does the opposite, it leaves me at peace, happy, and full of life, love, and joy.

Part of the Rite of Ordination calls for the Bishop to state to the man: “May God who has begun this good work in you, bring it to fulfillment.” I pray that God will continue to draw me closer to his bosom. That he will nourish me with his body and blood, keep me close to the sacrament of confession, and send me his saving love and help. I know that by coming to seminary I am taking a risk. I am surrendering everything to the will of God, asking only that he help me become the man he is calling me to be. Right now, that is as a single, celibate seminarian, discerning a vocation to the priesthood. I pray that one day, God may draw this work to fulfillment, that I may be filled with grace, peace, and love, as I say yes to him and vow my life to a life of a celibate; loving, giving, service to his church and the people of God. May God who has begun this good work in myself and my brothers, bring it to fulfillment.

“The harvest is abundant, but the labors are few…”

Deacon Immanuel, Bishop Medley, and Deacon Will, after the diaconate ordinations, last may.

Deacon Immanuel, Bishop Medley, and Deacon Will, after the diaconate ordinations, last may.

May you be covered in the dust of your rabbi!

The Gospel reading for Mass yesterday was from Mark 1:14-20.

Here’s an excerpt from the Gospel:

“As he passed by the Sea of Galilee,
he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting their nets into the sea;
they were fishermen.
Jesus said to them,
“Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”
Then they left their nets and followed him.”

The video above is done by Rob Bell, a evangelical pastor. Yes, not everything that he says is in line with church teaching, but the above video has a lot of important things and is based mostly, purely on history. “Dust” is a video which challenges us to consider what it took for the rabbi to choose his disciples. Christ was a revolutionary, he chose simple fishermen. We have a saying in Vocations Ministry that God doesn’t “Call the qualified, he qualifies the called.” What a wonderful thing we have to look forward to as men in formation! The entire work of formation is devoted to forming men after Christ’s heart. We need pastors who are sincere, who love the Eucharist, we need men who are willing to fight in the trenches and bring souls home for Christ! We need men who will be sacrificial and love all, putting their very lives on the line, so that souls may be rescued. We need a renewal in our culture and the church is forming men to combat the evil in the world. May God grant us the grace to persevere, may we as Pope Francis said, “smell like our sheep” May we be covered in the dust of our rabbi!

Invite a man to consider priesthood!

O Rex Gentium!

O-King-300x248

O Rex Gentium, et desideratus earum,
lapisque angularis, qui facis utraque unum:
veni, et salva hominem,
quem de limo formasti.

O King of all the nations, the only joy of every human heart;
O Keystone of the mighty arch of man:
Come and save the creature you fashioned from the dust.

From the Lectionary Cycle:

Rex gentium et lapis angularis Ecclesiae:
veni et salva hominem quem de limo formasti.

O King of all nations and keystone of the Church:
come and save man, whom you formed from the dust!

From the Hymn:

Veni, Veni, Rex Gentium, Veni, Redemptor omnium,
ut salvas tuos famulos peccati sibi conscios.

O Come, Desire of the nations, bind
in one the hearts of all mankind;
bid every strife and quarrel cease
and fill the world with heaven’s peace.

Today the Church calls to mind O Rex Gentium, that is O King of the Gentiles. If you look at the other meanings for the word Gens, or gentis which is where Gentium comes from, it can also mean people, nation, or a tribe. When we call to mind Christ as King today, we can remember that upon his birth the wise men from the East, were questioned by Herod as to where this “King’ would be born, because he was scared of him. So Herod went out and had all of the newborn male children killed. Joseph having a dream of an angel, took Mary and Jesus and fled with them to Egypt, so that Jesus would be safe. This is called the Feast of the Holy Innocents and was an example of why we call Joseph, “The Family Protector”.

We call Christ, King, because he is not only our ruler, but also our creator. We ask him to come and re-make us. To cast away our sin and put us back on the wheel to make us into what he desires. We ask Christ to make us like him. As Augustine once said: “Our Hearts were made for thee Oh Lord, and they are restless until they rest in thee. This evening we call upon our King to refashion our hearts like unto his. We call upon our maker to make us his, to set us free from our slavery to sin, we ask him to come, O Great King of the Gentiles, Great King of the Nations, Great King of Israel, O Rex Gentium, come quickly and do not tarry!!

Scriptural References for O Rex Gentium:

Isaiah 2:411:10

Psalm 47:8; Jeremiah 10:7

Daniel 7:14;

Haggai 2:8

Romans 15:12

Ephesians 2:1420

 

O Adonai

Image

From the Breviary:

Adonai, et dux domus Israel,
qui Moyse in igne flammae rubi apparuisti,
et ei in Sina legem dedisti:
veni ad redimendum nos in brachio extento.

Sacred Lord of ancient Israel,
who showed yourself to Moses in the burning bush,
who gave him the holy law on Sinai mountain:
Come, stretch out your mighty hand to set us free.

From the Lectionary Cycle:

Dux domus Israel, qui Moysi in Sina legem dedisti:
veni ad redimendum nos in bracchio extento.

O Leader of the House of Israel,
giver of the Law to Moses on Sinai:
come to rescue us with your mighty power!

From the Hymn:

Veni, Veni, Adonai, qui populo in Sinai
legem dedisti vertice in maiestate gloriae.

O Come, O Come, Thou Lord of might,
who to thy tribes on Sinai’s height
in ancient times didst give the law,
in cloud, and majesty, and awe.

This Evening the Antiphon for the Magnificat is O Adonai… The term adonai is the word that the Jewish People called God, he was their adonai, Sacred Lord, Master of All, their Majesty. They so reverenced the name of God that one has to wonder why we do not any more? They were scared that if they mentioned the name of God they would use it unworthily, that they would be profaning his sacred name. And now when we go out of our homes we hear his name used for anything and everything, we hear that his last name is Da*nit, We hear his son’s name used when someone scares someone, when someone slams their finger in the door “JESUS CHRIST!” or just Christ. At what point did we begin to have such disregard for the Lord’s name? Let us take today as a chance to go back to our respect of his name, let us join with our Jewish brethren in exclaiming O Majesty! O Sacred Lord! O Master of All! O Adonai!

The Church remembers today: the giving of the law to Moses, the law that we are born with written on our hearts, and the power of God to deliver us from slavery to Satan.

Scripture References to O Adonai:

Exodus 3:2

Isaiah 33:2263:11-12

Micah 6:4

Acts 7:30-31